Product Description

Model NO 

28HS33-0804A Type Electromechanical

Certification 

CCC,ISO90O1,Ce Brand chensite

efficiency

high size NEMA 8

Length

33mm Weight 110g

Transport Package

carton Specification 110g/140g/180g

Trademark

chensite Origin china

HS Code

8501310000 Production Capacity 50000/year

Detailed Photos

 

A stepper motor driver controls the stepper motor’s windings based on external control pulses and direction signals, energizing the windings CHINAMFG or backward through its internal logic circuitry over a predefined period, thereby causing the reduction motor to rotate or lock in the forward/backward direction. Taking a 1.8-degree, two-phase stepper motor as an example: when the two-phase windings are energized, the motor’s output shaft will come to a standstill and lock into position. The maximum torque required to lock the reduction motor under its rated current is known as the holding torque. If the current in 1 phase winding is reversed, the motor will take a step in the predetermined direction (1.8 degrees). Similarly, if the current in the other winding is reversed, the motor will take a step (1.8 degrees) in the opposite direction. As the current through the coil windings is sequentially reversed, the motor will continuously rotate in the intended direction with very high operational precision. A 1.8-degree, two-phase stepper reduction motor performs 200 steps per revolution.

Products Application

 

 

Factory Shows

Chensite is a leading manufacturer with advanced technology and innovative management mode. Hetaispecializes in producing servo motors,Dc Motors,hybrid stepping motors,drivers and so on.
Chensite dedicates to professional electrical integration and automation strategies for customers. The products are almost applied in obots, packing machinery, textile machinery,medical instruments, printing machinery, intelligent logistics equipment Chensite also sends its products to USA, Europe,Southeast Asia and all-around China.

Certifications

 

FAQ

 

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Application: Printing Equipment
Speed: High Speed
Number of Stator: Four-Phase
Excitation Mode: PM-Permanent Magnet
Number of Poles: 8
Operate Mode: Three-Phase Six-Step
Samples:
US$ 19.9/Piece
1 Piece(Min.Order)

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Customization:
Available

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brake motor

How do brake motors handle variations in brake torque and response time?

Brake motors are designed to handle variations in brake torque and response time to ensure reliable and efficient braking performance. These variations can arise due to different operating conditions, load characteristics, or specific application requirements. Here’s a detailed explanation of how brake motors handle variations in brake torque and response time:

  • Brake Design and Construction: The design and construction of brake systems in brake motors play a crucial role in handling variations in brake torque and response time. Brake systems typically consist of brake pads or shoes that press against a brake disc or drum to generate frictional forces and provide braking action. The materials used for the brake components, such as brake linings, can be selected or designed to offer a wide range of torque capacities and response characteristics. By choosing the appropriate materials and optimizing the brake system design, brake motors can accommodate variations in torque requirements and response times.
  • Brake Control Mechanisms: Brake motors employ different control mechanisms to manage brake torque and response time. These mechanisms can be mechanical, electrical, or a combination of both. Mechanical control mechanisms often utilize springs or levers to apply and release the brake, while electrical control mechanisms rely on electromagnets or solenoids to engage or disengage the brake. The control mechanisms can be adjusted or configured to modulate the brake torque and response time based on the specific needs of the application.
  • Brake Torque Adjustments: Brake motors may offer provisions for adjusting the brake torque to accommodate variations in load requirements. This can be achieved through the selection of different brake linings or by adjusting the spring tension or magnetic force within the brake system. By modifying the brake torque, brake motors can provide the necessary braking force to meet the demands of different operating conditions or load characteristics.
  • Response Time Optimization: Brake motors can be engineered to optimize the response time of the braking system. The response time refers to the time it takes for the brake to engage or disengage once the control signal is applied. Several factors can influence the response time, including the design of the control mechanism, the characteristics of the brake linings, and the braking system’s overall dynamics. By fine-tuning these factors, brake motors can achieve faster or slower response times as required by the application, ensuring effective and timely braking action.
  • Electronic Control Systems: In modern brake motors, electronic control systems are often employed to enhance the flexibility and precision of brake torque and response time adjustments. These systems utilize sensors, feedback mechanisms, and advanced control algorithms to monitor and regulate the brake performance. Electronic control allows for real-time adjustments and precise control of the brake torque and response time, making brake motors more adaptable to variations in operating conditions and load requirements.

By combining appropriate brake design and construction, control mechanisms, torque adjustments, response time optimization, and electronic control systems, brake motors can effectively handle variations in brake torque and response time. This enables them to provide reliable and efficient braking performance across a wide range of operating conditions, load characteristics, and application requirements.

brake motor

What maintenance practices are essential for extending the lifespan of a brake motor?

Maintaining a brake motor properly is crucial for extending its lifespan and ensuring optimal performance. Regular maintenance practices help prevent premature wear, identify potential issues, and address them promptly. Here are some essential maintenance practices for extending the lifespan of a brake motor:

  • Cleanliness: Keeping the brake motor clean is important to prevent the accumulation of dirt, dust, or debris that can affect its performance. Regularly inspect the motor and clean it using appropriate cleaning methods and materials, ensuring that the power is disconnected before performing any cleaning tasks.
  • Lubrication: Proper lubrication of the brake motor’s moving parts is essential to minimize friction and reduce wear and tear. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations regarding the type of lubricant to use and the frequency of lubrication. Ensure that the lubrication points are accessible and apply the lubricant in the recommended amounts.
  • Inspection: Regular visual inspections of the brake motor are necessary to identify any signs of damage, loose connections, or abnormal wear. Check for any loose or damaged components, such as bolts, cables, or connectors. Inspect the brake pads or discs for wear and ensure they are properly aligned. If any issues are detected, take appropriate action to address them promptly.
  • Brake Adjustment: Periodically check and adjust the brake mechanism of the motor to ensure it maintains proper braking performance. This may involve adjusting the brake pads, ensuring proper clearance, and verifying that the braking force is sufficient. Improper brake adjustment can lead to excessive wear, reduced stopping power, or safety hazards.
  • Temperature Monitoring: Monitoring the operating temperature of the brake motor is important to prevent overheating and thermal damage. Ensure that the motor is not subjected to excessive ambient temperatures or overloaded conditions. If the motor becomes excessively hot, investigate the cause and take corrective measures, such as improving ventilation or reducing the load.
  • Vibration Analysis: Periodic vibration analysis can help detect early signs of mechanical problems or misalignment in the brake motor. Using specialized equipment or vibration monitoring systems, measure and analyze the motor’s vibration levels. If abnormal vibrations are detected, investigate and address the underlying issues to prevent further damage.
  • Electrical Connections: Regularly inspect the electrical connections of the brake motor to ensure they are secure and free from corrosion. Loose or faulty connections can lead to power issues, motor malfunctions, or electrical hazards. Tighten any loose connections and clean any corrosion using appropriate methods and materials.
  • Testing and Calibration: Perform periodic testing and calibration of the brake motor to verify its performance and ensure it operates within the specified parameters. This may involve conducting load tests, verifying braking force, or checking the motor’s speed and torque. Follow the manufacturer’s guidelines or consult with qualified technicians for proper testing and calibration procedures.
  • Documentation and Record-keeping: Maintain a record of all maintenance activities, inspections, repairs, and any relevant information related to the brake motor. This documentation helps track the maintenance history, identify recurring issues, and plan future maintenance tasks effectively. It also serves as a reference for warranty claims or troubleshooting purposes.
  • Professional Servicing: In addition to regular maintenance tasks, consider scheduling professional servicing and inspections by qualified technicians. They can perform comprehensive checks, identify potential issues, and perform specialized maintenance procedures that require expertise or specialized tools. Professional servicing can help ensure thorough maintenance and maximize the lifespan of the brake motor.

By following these essential maintenance practices, brake motor owners can enhance the lifespan of the motor, reduce the risk of unexpected failures, and maintain its optimal performance. Regular maintenance not only extends the motor’s lifespan but also contributes to safe operation, energy efficiency, and overall reliability.

brake motor

What is a brake motor and how does it operate?

A brake motor is a type of electric motor that incorporates a mechanical braking system. It is designed to provide both motor power and braking functionality in a single unit. The brake motor is commonly used in applications where rapid and precise stopping or holding of loads is required. Here’s a detailed explanation of what a brake motor is and how it operates:

A brake motor consists of two main components: the electric motor itself and a braking mechanism. The electric motor converts electrical energy into mechanical energy to drive a load. The braking mechanism, usually located at the non-drive end of the motor, provides the necessary braking force to stop or hold the load when the motor is turned off or power is cut off.

The braking mechanism in a brake motor typically employs one of the following types of brakes:

  1. Electromagnetic Brake: An electromagnetic brake is the most common type used in brake motors. It consists of an electromagnetic coil and a brake shoe or armature. When the motor is powered, the electromagnetic coil is energized, creating a magnetic field that attracts the brake shoe or armature. This releases the brake and allows the motor to rotate and drive the load. When the power is cut off or the motor is turned off, the electromagnetic coil is de-energized, and the brake shoe or armature is pressed against a stationary surface, creating friction and stopping the motor’s rotation.
  2. Mechanical Brake: Some brake motors use mechanical brakes, such as disc brakes or drum brakes. These brakes employ friction surfaces, such as brake pads or brake shoes, which are pressed against a rotating disc or drum attached to the motor shaft. When the motor is powered, the brake is disengaged, allowing the motor to rotate. When the power is cut off or the motor is turned off, a mechanical mechanism, such as a spring or a cam, engages the brake, creating friction and stopping the motor’s rotation.

The operation of a brake motor involves the following steps:

  1. Motor Operation: When power is supplied to the brake motor, the electric motor converts electrical energy into mechanical energy, which is used to drive the load. The brake is disengaged, allowing the motor shaft to rotate freely.
  2. Stopping or Holding: When the power is cut off or the motor is turned off, the braking mechanism is engaged. In the case of an electromagnetic brake, the electromagnetic coil is de-energized, and the brake shoe or armature is pressed against a stationary surface, creating friction and stopping the motor’s rotation. In the case of a mechanical brake, a mechanical mechanism engages the brake pads or shoes against a rotating disc or drum, creating friction and stopping the motor’s rotation.
  3. Release and Restart: To restart the motor, power is supplied again, and the braking mechanism is disengaged. In the case of an electromagnetic brake, the electromagnetic coil is energized, releasing the brake shoe or armature. In the case of a mechanical brake, the mechanical mechanism disengages the brake pads or shoes from the rotating disc or drum.

Brake motors are commonly used in applications that require precise stopping or holding of loads, such as cranes, hoists, conveyors, machine tools, and elevators. The incorporation of a braking system within the motor eliminates the need for external braking devices or additional components, simplifying the design and installation process. Brake motors enhance safety, efficiency, and control in industrial applications by providing reliable and rapid braking capabilities.

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editor by CX 2024-04-23